Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Another mystery

Driving to see lovely friend D of 60goingon16, yesterday, I pulled into a lay-by to look at the stunning view of Exmoor and to check the directions and this is what I saw under the hedge. I have been pondering the significance of the carefully arranged thermos (minus its stopper and cup) inside the remains of a tyre ever since.
Is it some secret sign among Gentlemen of the Road? Have the Cornish piskies been holidaying in Devon? Or could it have any connection with the Winterbourne Mystery?

18 comments:

  1. Bloimey, it sure is darned spooky round them there parts, M. Fair sends a shiver down me spoine. Tis a wonder that you venture out at all. I'm almost too frightened to keep on visiting your blog. Where will it all end???

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  2. Well, from the accent, I think you must have one foot in the middle of Romney Marsh and the other in the Forest of Dean! Be careful.

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  3. You'll find many a strange object under a Devon hedge and, from time to time, you can even find a strange Devonian there too.

    One of the local riff raff, I mean a member of our local community, has a penchant for cider but is not allowed to drink at home. So he stores his cider stash in one of the roadside gritting boxes and drinks his cider out of a can (or out of many cans) while he's driving round the leafy lanes. Then he chucks the empty cans into the hedgerows. Haven't seen him with a Thermos flask or an old tyre though.

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  4. I'm glad he wasn't under that particular hedge, yesterday.

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  5. Anywhere west of Dagenham is West Country to me, M.

    And I listen to The Archers, so Oi'm really good at wildy veering accents! Innit?

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  6. Sounds like you're geographical knowledge might be as limited as mine, J. My husband swear i only married him because he was a navigation officer - he was right, too.

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  7. Actually, M, just to put the geographical record straight, my ancestral roots are firmly in Dorset/Wilts/Hants and I didn't even know where Essex was until I was 26!

    (Ooooh arrr)

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  8. I wouldn't get a job as a proofreader, would I? That's what happens when I get clever and take my eyes off the keys!

    J- I moved from Lancashire to Hampshire to Devon and haven't a clue how I got there!

    E, I didn't think to look OVER the hedge!

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  9. Oi! 'Tis you'se furriners be the one's wiv de aaaccents - not we :-)

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  10. Accents I can't tell by reading the comments, but some of the colloquialisms, like "roadside gritting boxes" baffle?

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  11. Don't you have boxes of grit by your roadsides, e? The grit (perhaps you call it something else?) is for icy conditions and we have been known to scatter a little when the farmers have left a lot of mud or slurry on the lanes and we have skidded into the ditch!

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  12. Ah so. I wouldn't have guessed the answer easily.

    Here grits are eaten for breakfast.

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  13. I see your problem, e! You must have wondered why we would have boxes of breakfast cereal by the roadside! Perhaps you call the stuff we mean gravel or aggregate?

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  14. Sand is what we call sand, David. Grit is what we call gravel when it is a box by the roadside!

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  15. Maureen: I've seen your beaches. If we tried to spread what you Brits call sand on our roads, we'd all break our axles.

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  16. You obviously haven't been to the Devon beaches, David, or could American axles be as bad as we've heard?

    I'm in London, far from our lovely beaches at present, eagerly awaiting the birth of the first grandchild.

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I love to read your comments and promise that I will reply as soon as I can leave my garden, sewing room or kitchen!